WORK IS GOOD
If you are not prepared for TODAY’S job market, you may have to find a time machine and go back 50 years to find a job. Today’s employer is looking for serious people who can do more than remember their own name. They are looking for drug-free, encumbrance-free, forward-thinking people who take their jobs more seriously than their planning for Friday night. And that’s just to get in their door.

It may be a great motivational article that gives you the momentum you need to land your next challenging job, or a simple tip that moves your career forward in your current position. Work Is Good ® has been designed by true employment professionals to cut through the unproven theories you will see on the internet and get to usable information that can help in your job search, interview techniques and career building methods to get you where you need to be: employed, happy, productive and informed.

Work Is Good ® is a collaborative effort of many organizations that specialize in providing employment-related services, advice and counsel to job seekers, hiring employers and business managers and is offered as a view of the future of work, not just a compilation of what has been. As a matter of fact, Work Is Good ® is the “Participant’s” (employee, vendor, board member, freelancers and contractors, and community members) point of view into The Great Workplace 2.0 ™ and is designed to help individuals be most effective in the workplace of today and tomorrow.

The very nature of work, who does it, where, why and with whom has changed and will never be the same. Our purpose is to keep you thoroughly informed and prepared to tackle all your challenges ahead.





  1. Job Seeker Question for 2.23.10

    Susie Sharp posted a question on Facebook and asked us to respond. There is not enough room to really answer the question on Facebook, so here is the question and first part of a response:

    Jobseekers are trained to avoid HR Departments as they screen a person OUT of a position and see how many hoops one will jump through. Behavior based interviews, STAR based interviews … blech. What, if anything, is the HR profession doing to dispel these perceptions?”

    First, understand that HR professionals are supposed to screen out people who do not fit the requirements of a position. That is the service they provide to hiring authorities. At the same time, their responsibilities are to screen in those who are qualified and attract the most qualified to want to work at their company.

    Human Resource professionals are typically not sales people, nor have most been trained in customer service behaviors. They are by nature GATE KEEPERS. And that function is NEVER an easy one. Many HR people will present an attitude of exclusivity and eliteness, and to a job seeker (or Recruiter) that attitude will come off in a personal and negative way. In coming off that way, many HR folks believe it makes it easier to do their job, to be the Gate Keeper. Some, unfortunately, seem to revel in being part of the elite, and employed. To be honest, we all feel very sorry for them. Their company presidents need to know who they are as they are definitely ruining the good brand of the company.

    In the defense of HR (I have been there) many operations people will not give HR the tools they need to do a good job in recruiting. And unfortunately many people in HR are not professionally equipped on how to get those tools (time for discussions, job descriptions, strategies, insights, etc.). This then puts HR in the unenviable position of having to screen out or in, and not really knowing on what to make an evaluation. The result is a defensive attitude. Can’t let the outsider know you don’t know what to do.

    On the other hand, the entire profession of HR is geared toward making their members feel special. They even go to the extent of convincing the members to ‘demand a seat at the table’ (Board Table). If you have ever wanted to feel important, just let someone tell you that your expertise belongs at a board level.

    On the “other-other hand,” HR people have had a bad rap. They are trained in all sorts of skills that have nothing to do with their dealing with the public. They get the shaft from outsiders and from insiders equally. If you REALLY want to feel the cold shoulder, be an Executive Recruiter or Staffing professional at a third party. You would think that you forgot to shower, for the last year. Even when like me, you have gray hairs and have forgotten more about HR than the best 30 year old with a degree in Art History.

    So, to answer the question for job seekers:

    Know what to expect from HR so that you don’t get ticked off. Avoid HR when you can, but don’t make their job harder by bothering C-level people with blather and droning requests for a cup of coffee and an hour of their time. Go to a networking seminar (Jeff Nischwitz on relationship building. Akers and Miracle on Job Search) and don’t expect that just because your wife thinks you deserve a job that you’ll get hired with your tie half way up from your belt. Rehearse a value proposition, an elevator speech and an ability to look someone in the eyes.

    Get a recruiter in your field. Maybe two. But don’t expect them to try to FIND YOU a job. They work for their hiring authority clients, not you. Live with it. They know a good product when they see it, so ask for help, not a hand out. Most recruiters are broke after last year and are, like you, looking for the best deals they can get.

    Last: get off your duff and volunteer somewhere. Not for profits are hurting worse than you. It may teach you to appreciate what you have and not expect more than you have prepared for.

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