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The Great Workplace 2.0
Connect. Engage. Collaborate.™

 

2012.09.25

The purpose of The Great Workplace 2.0™ is simple: while it is happening, show core changes in great workplaces, so that start-ups, small and mid-size companies, can extract the principles that other companies are discovering. By example, grow in a healthy and sustainable fashion; return to our economy great dividends of revenue, value and innovation.

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2010.03.04

What are you looking for when reading a resume? Here’s a few suggestions. What do you normally look for when reading all those resumes?

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2010.03.04

Barb Westfall (not her real name) was engaged at age 20. Once engaged she dropped her Spanish minor, realizing that her idea of becoming a radio personality for Voice of America in Spain wasn’t going to pan out, if she wanted to stay with her fiancé while he attended dental school in Ohio. She graduated with a major in communications and started her career as a waitress before landing an entry-level job at an in-house advertising department for an industrial manufacturing firm. After a few years she became bored with the work and was lonely since her husband was working long hours on a PhD. Her husband encouraged her to attend law school and she did. She enjoyed the hard work and personal sense of accomplishment that came with performing well, in school. She found an interesting job as an assistant city prosecutor. Her husband finished his PhD and was accepted ...
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2010.03.03

Regardless of what Human Resource professionals tell their superiors, they can’t and don’t read and truly consider all of them. Work Is Good ® has a unique insight into what Human Resource professionals actually do in responding to applications through ads, internet, help-wanted signs and social media. We will give you an idea of what happens behind the scenes, then offer advice on how to deal with it: Most resumes are not read as they arrive (instantly). Most HR folks have been trained to carve out “Resume Time” during the day (or week), unless the position opening has some urgency. If the response to a job listing produces about 40 documents in a week (or day), HR won’t read more than the “Obvious Fits”. “Obvious Fit” means the following: Well laid out format (someone took the time to produce a “classic” document), key words that stand out on the resume (or cover ...
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2010.03.02

Don’t “Self-Reject” You saw a great job on your favorite job board. But, you don’t have everything that the company is asking for. You have some of it, but not all…. should you bother applying? When looking for a new career opportunity, one of the hardest things to do is to be creative, think outside the box, take a risk. As a seasoned job search counselor, I have had to help many of my clients deal with “self rejection”. This behavior causes the job hunter to pass up on opportunities that might very well lead to their next job. Do you like to be rejected? Do you like to fail? Do you like to be “turned down”? The answer? In the words of my teenage children, “Duh, um no!” (Note: the words “duh” and “no” must be spoken with appropriate inflection…). Since basic human nature causes us to avoid rejection, especially ...
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2010.02.16

Over the next several weeks, The Great Workplace.com is going to introduce North East Ohio to a new set of standards for organizations striving to become noted as a Great Place To Work, or as we call it, The Great Workplace 2.0: Each article will give you an in-depth view of the results of 3 years of research into what The Great Workplace MANAGERS and OWNERS believe and know make their organization special. We are NOT talking about the Fortune 100 companies or the High-Tech companies who have become synonymous with "Corporate Benefit Give-A-Ways", we are showing you ideas that YOU can duplicate in your own company: principles and actions that can be applied in start-ups, old-line companies, and organizations who simply know that "something needs to change". Let’s cut to the chase: the discoverable attributes of The Great Workplace of today and tomorrow have been right under our noses for ...
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2010.01.25

The state of Ohio mines nearly 4,000,000 tons of salt a year! That’s incredible. As a matter of fact, salt was the first mineral to be mined in the state. Data shows that back in the 1700’s, early frontiersman made salt at natural springs in the Southern Ohio area, and to catch you up1 to speed with the importance of salt…it was used by ancient societies as a form of money! Actually the word salary is derived from the Latin word salarium, which is defined as “salt allowance.” How about the fact that the two active salt rock operations in Ohio are both located in North East Ohio? Yup, Fairport Harbor and Cleveland. Ohio Salt Mines are the third largest producer of the precious mineral in the entire country, yet this underground world deep under Lake Erie’s lake-floor is a universe where a galaxy of miners are unknown to so ...
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