WARNING: Ohio’s BWC Drug Free Safety Program May be Hazardous to Your Company’s Health!
By Admin

August 24, 2010

I’m sure you’ve heard Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation removed the DFWP (Drug Free Workplace Program) with the new and improved DFSP (Drug Free SAFETY Program). This new program took effect July 1, 2010.

But now the Department of Transportation through its Office of Drug and Alcohol Policy Compliance has approved the rule that will make the previously announced changes to federal testing mandatory and effective October 1, 2010. Let’s see. They’ve lowered the tolerances for cocaine, amphetamines and methamphetamines (less tolerance) which is good. Then they added to the list of five: marijuana, cocaine, opiates, codeine/morphine and amphetamines – ecstasy.

So … now, our new and improved DFSP will change yet again. The bureau will accept the DOT standard.

You’ll have to update your policy to include ecstasy. You’ll have to reword the tolerance levels (lower them to match the DOT).  If you have a labor contract you may need to go back to the table to include these changes. And don’t forget to check with your company’s attorney before you implement anything new. (There goes that “sweet” discount the bureau’s dangling with this program!)

But here’s my real issue with the new DFSP.  The required form DFSP – 1 Accident Report must be completed within 30 days of a known injury preferably online. This report reveals the employees name and a description of accident. How secure is this report?  Will it be kept private?  Can the public have access to this information? How will the bureau protect and keep this information confidential?

Injuries and accidents unfortunately happen but so does workplace violence.  I see no reason to impose an additional assault on an innocent victim by making this information public. Without a commitment from the BWC to hold and maintain these records in a confidential manner I feel employers will fall victim themselves.

Author:


1 COMMENT
  1. Good question to point out. The importance of privacy cannot be understated and violating this privacy may jeopardize drug free workplace policies.

POST A COMMENT